Tips to Keep Yourself Safe on the Road This Summer by Alek Sabin

As summer nears, everyone starts to drive a lot more. People plan road trips with their families. People drive and check out the beautiful scenery around them. People visit family and friends. This time of year is when people start to hit the road a lot more. However, the increased driving comes with increased risk. Here are some tips to help keep you safe on the road this summer.


Carry the Right Equipment
You may very well already keep a few items stashed in your car for safer driving, but chances are
there are a few things that your car could still use. Assuming you’ve already taken care of emergency
items like jumper cables, blankets, a phone charger, and flares, here is a brief list of things that can
help keep both you and your car in top driving condition on a regular basis.


  • Pressure Gauge for Tires: Many drivers neglect to keep up with their tire pressure, but proper
  • tire pressure is essential for safe driving. Driving with underinflated tires can increase your
  • stopping distance, overheat your tires, and make your tires more susceptible to running over
  • sharp objects (because more tire hits the road).
  • Read this blog here to learn more about tire maintenance.
  • Jumper Cables: It’s always a good idea to just have a pair of jumper cables in your car, in case
  • something ever drains your battery. It also has the added benefit of helping you be a good
  • Samaritan by helping other people who might end up stranded in a parking lot or on the side of
  • the road.
  • A Pair of Sunglasses: If you don’t already have a good pair of sunglasses in the car for extra
  • sunny days, now is the time to get one. Sure, they come in handy on sunny days, but sometimes
  • they really can prove essential for safe driving—especially if you commute to work as the sun is
  • still rising.
  • Spare Eyeglasses (if necessary): If you usually wear contacts when you drive, it’s a good idea
  • to keep a spare pair of eyeglasses in your car. You never know when one of your contacts
  • might begin to bother your eye so much that it inhibits your driving. Having a pair of eyeglasses
  • and a contact lens case on hand allows you to stop somewhere and switch to eyeglasses so
  • you don’t have to attempt to drive with irritated eyes.
  • Water: If you’re driving long distances, always keep a bit of water in your car in case you get
  • stuck and start to feel dehydrated.


Don’t Try to Multitask
Too many people think that they are good enough multitaskers to drive and do other things. However,
the truth is that multitasking when driving, as participating in these distracting activities actually
requires our brains to rapidly shift between two cognitive activities. Even the simplest of activities fall
under that multitasking umbrella, including eating, talking on your cell phone, changing music, and
studying the surrounding landscape. Resolve not to multitask while driving, and remember not to
justify even the smallest of distractions.


Check Traffic and Road Conditions
Many people are used to checking the weather in the morning, but fewer will check road conditions
along with the weather. This is an especially important thing to do, even during the summer months
when you don’t have to worry about snow. Instead of assuming that roads will be clear for safe
driving, check online or by phone to get your local driving conditions. This can help you determine
which roads to take and which ones to avoid. Your local Department of Transportation might even
make this easy by sending you live text updates.


Try Carpooling
In addition to saving on gas money, preserving the environment, and decreasing traffic on the roads,
carpooling has another advantage you may not have considered: safety. Imagine how much safer it is
to have an extra set of eyes and ears on the road with you as you drive.


Be Smart with Your GPS
Instead of letting your GPS tell you where to turn when you get to each and every turn, stop for a
moment before leaving for your destination and get a good grasp of the route you’ll be taking. This will
prevent the GPS from becoming a distraction while you’re driving to a new place. It also helps keep
your sense of direction active, so that you can notice when your GPS might be making mistakes.
Instead of letting your GPS tell you where to turn when you get to each and every turn, stop for a
moment before leaving for your destination and get a good grasp of the route you’ll be taking. This
will prevent the GPS from becoming a distraction while you’re driving to a new place.

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